We already talked about the exhibition of the Department of Design at the Faculty of Fine Art, Music and Design, University of Bergen (formerly Bergen Academy of Art and Design) at “Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair” (“Exhibitin prison design” here), but not about the process behind it.

For their collaboration with Bergen Correctional Service the students were asked to split up in 3 different categories: design an object for the prison, design an object that could be used in transitioning housings or design an object that could be achievable for the inmates to produce in the prison workshops. The last option is interesting because it forces the designer not only to create but also to think about the process behind his work, allowing people not skilled to make their objects too. The two projects that we are going to present today are DYPP and LIGHT-UP, two different lamps created for the inmates to produce in the prison workshops. Both projects have also the aim to give something more to produce than just the normal products available online.

 

 

DYPP is made by Vilde Sæternes Johannesen, her focus has been on making an object easy to reproduce but that can give a great sense of achievement while doing the job. She also wanted to focus on environmental friendly techniques, this is why she chose the steam-bending, an ancient process sadly succumbed to newer technology. The result is a product made with a low-waste process, a minimal design in which the line become essential, accentuated by the colored textile cord. Made with solid oak and concrete, it’s 1,95cm in height.

 

LIGHT-UP is a product by Elisabeth Frafjord Solberg. As Vilde the design is based on the idea of enabling inmates to build an easy and beautiful product that they can be proud of.  Differently from DYPP, not all the parts can be made and assembled in the prison, for example the Carrara marble foot. The important thing is to produce at least some in the workshops to connect the inmates to the process and the final outcome. The lamp is made with Carrara marble, lacquered steel, lacquered aluminum and brass.

 

All Rights Reserved to Vilde Sæternes Johannesen, Elisabeth Frafjord Solberg and WeVux

Related Post